THInterested in checking out what’s on this week? We’ve rounded up some reviews so you can pick the play that’s right for you. 

 

ADDICTED, ADEDO

Toronto Star – Karen Fricker

“Dauda displays considerable skill as she jumps back and forth between these characters in quick succession, varying her physicality, voice and pacing. Quick moves between location and time are indicated clearly under d’bi.young anitafrika’s direction and aided by Sharmylae Taffe-Fletcher’s lighting design.”

 

AN AMERICAN IN PARIS, Mirvish

Globe and Mail – Martha Schabas

“Against a backdrop of floating shapes in bold colours, Wheeldon creates an invigorating neo-classical sequence that echoes with the big dance names of the era – George Balanchine and Jerome Robbins. The dancers wear leotards that look like Mondrian paintings (with many of the women en pointe) and showcase imaginative choreographic detail through their upper bodies.”

Toronto Star – Karen Fricker & Michael Crabb

“I loved the way so much of the story is driven by the choreography and how all the elements flow together.”

NOW Magazine – Glenn Sumi

“If you’re tempted to leave during intermission – silly plot, uneven acting/singing, a lack of narrative tension – resist the urge. The second act of the Gershwin musical An American In Paris pays off with a series of numbers, including the titular dance sequence, that are totally worth the price of admission.

Stage Door Christopher Hoile

“Strength, precision and beauty of line characterize all [Maddox’s] dance movements and he can easily blend ballet with other dance styles.  He is also a fine actor and a fine singer although he tends to be a bit unsteady in his upper range.”

CATEGORY E, Coal Mine

Globe and Mail – J. Kelly Nestruck

Category E feels like many scripts that come out of Alberta – unpretentious in tone, and unafraid to engage with popular culture. How refreshing to have a character living in a dystopian environment who has actually seen a post-apocalyptic film or two – and not just the works of Samuel Beckett.”

Toronto Star – Carly Maga

“Bodie and the cast dig into the absurdity of Cornish’s script, which lies in this metaphor. Bentley, in particular, has a particularly feral quality as Filigree, haphazardly socialized by Corcoran after being bred in captivity.”

NOW Magazine – Christopher Hoile

“Despite the best efforts of the cast under the taut direction of Rae Ellen Bodie, our interest wanes early on when we realize all the play will give us is an insufficiently examined glimpse of three characters’ progressive degeneration.

Slotkin Letter – Lynn Slotkin

“Director Rae Ellen Bodie beautifully creates and controls the build of the tension of the piece as each character gradually endures more experiments, leaving us wondering what is happening to them and really, why?”

COME FROM AWAY, Mirvish

Globe and Mail – J. Kelly Nestruck

“And the new Toronto cast provides a chance for some Canadian performers you may know from ‘supporting’ or ‘featured’ roles to take the lead in this kinetic ensemble production directed by Christopher Ashley.”

Toronto Star – Carly Maga

“This new cast reveals humour as one of the driving forces behind the musical’s identity and message — it builds bonds, it invites, and it makes unimaginable circumstances bearable to start, and eventually joyous.

NOW Magazine – Susan G. Cole

“Christopher Ashley, who won a Tony award for direction, keeps everyone moving non-stop, ingeniously recreating the vibe on a plane, on a careening bus or in a packed bar. If anything, it all moves at almost too much of a breakneck speed.

Slotkin Letter – Lynn Slotkin

“It’s a wonderful story told in this glorious musical and yes, in these troubled times, this show is needed. See it and take Kleenex.”

Stage Door Christopher Hoile

“The result is a musical where the acting and singing of the cast and the folk music–inspired playing of the nine onstage musicians combine in the united goal of telling a story in the most effective way possible.”

LOVE AND INFORMATION, Canadian Stage

Globe and Mail – J. Kelly Nestruck

“Perhaps stage actors will soon be revered anew as artisans keeping the archaic art of memorization alive – while the rest of us outsource our memories to Google. The nine here are solid, playing a dozen parts each, and occasionally breaking out into a group dance set to the Hall & Oates song Kiss on My List, prancing around the versatile but ugly set designed by Eo Sharp.”

Toronto Star – Karen Fricker

“Clear costume and staging choices go a long way in establishing scenarios, as when a distraught Huculak asks Millar, who’s wearing an orange jumpsuit, “God told you to do it?” through telephone receivers and a pane of glass.”

NOW Magazine – Glenn Sumi

“It’s up to a strong director to help shape this into a cohesive whole. One of my problems with this production is that two directors – Tanja Jacobs and Alistair Newton, both York MFA students – share the credit. The result is predictably uneven.

Stage Door Christopher Hoile

“All eight actors work as a tight ensemble and it is a wonder they can keep the myriad characters they play so clearly in their minds.  Jason Cadieux is especially good as a slimy interviewer who suggests that the ancient Greeks were right to drown the mathematician Hippasus who came up with the notion of irrational numbers.”

LE MENTEUR, Théâtre français

Stage Door Christopher Hoile

“One of the great virtues of this production is its cast.  They speak Corneille’s muscular French couplets with such clarity and understanding that, if you are Anglophone but know French, you will find little reason to glance at the English surtitles. You can’t help but wonder why the young actors at Stratford aren’t able to speak Shakespeare as well as these young actors speak Corneille.”

TAKE D MILK, NAH?, Passe Muraille, Pandemic, b current

Toronto Star – Carly Maga

“Parasram’s segue from his skepticism around the identity play to the history of Indian “indentured servitude” in the Caribbean, stemming from the colonial evils of Winston Churchill, is chillingly engrossing, as is Pandemic’s style.”

NOW Magazine – Jordan Bimm

“Parasram, assisted here by director Tom Arthur Davis, is a gifted and endlessly watchable performer whose affable delivery and well-crafted stories generate frequent and sustained laughs, but he is also able to instantaneously deadpan to emphasize very serious points.

Slotkin Letter – Lynn Slotkin

“Also a thing of beauty is how Parasram works the audience, first embracing them then sending a graceful dart to skewer an attitude.”

THERAC 25, Unit 102

Slotkin Letter – Lynn Slotkin

“Jessie Fraser has directed Therac 25 with efficiency, clarity and has not fallen into the trap of sentimentality. ”