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theresa cutknife iPhoto caption: Theresa Cutknife headshot by Dahlia Katz.

Speaking in Draft: Theresa Cutknife

“Of course, we all have to make money and make different sacrifices just to pay the bills, because this city is so horribly overpriced,” says Cutknife. “But why? Why do we have to suffer to feel like we’ve paid our dues to the industry?”

By Nathaniel Hanula-James / Jul 17, 2024
toronto fringe iPhoto caption: Two Fringers pose next to a wall of posters. Photo courtesy of Toronto Fringe.

Missing Toronto Fringe? Now’s your chance to make a difference

Following a successful festival, the Toronto Fringe continues to accept donations as part of its Tip the Fringe campaign.

By Aisling Murphy / Jul 16, 2024
theresa cutknife iPhoto caption: Theresa Cutknife headshot by Dahlia Katz.

Speaking in Draft: Theresa Cutknife

“Of course, we all have to make money and make different sacrifices just to pay the bills, because this city is so horribly overpriced,” says Cutknife. “But why? Why do we have to suffer to feel like we’ve paid our dues to the industry?”

By Nathaniel Hanula-James / Jul 17, 2024
toronto fringe iPhoto caption: Two Fringers pose next to a wall of posters. Photo courtesy of Toronto Fringe.

Missing Toronto Fringe? Now’s your chance to make a difference

Following a successful festival, the Toronto Fringe continues to accept donations as part of its Tip the Fringe campaign.

By Aisling Murphy / Jul 16, 2024
iPhoto caption: Photos courtesy of the productions photographed. From L-R, top to bottom: 86 Me, Bus Stop, Rosamund, 1 Santosh Santosh 2 Go, Far-Flung Peoples, Death of a Starman, See You Tomorrow, Before We Go, and Gulp.

Toronto Fringe’s New Young Reviewers 2024 | Round Two

The second round of reviews from the Toronto Fringe's New Young Reviewers program is here!

By Toronto Fringe New Young Reviewers Program / Jul 15, 2024
the last timbit iPhoto caption: Photo by Dahlia Katz.

REVIEW: The Last Timbit is a surprisingly charming commercial gem

The Last Timbit, a show of snow and sweets, had a limited run at the Elgin Theatre in June and is getting a streaming release on Crave on August 12. I, for one, am more than curious to see how a wider audience will react.

By Andrea Perez / Jul 12, 2024

Reviews

iPhoto caption: Photos courtesy of the productions photographed. From L-R, top to bottom: 86 Me, Bus Stop, Rosamund, 1 Santosh Santosh 2 Go, Far-Flung Peoples, Death of a Starman, See You Tomorrow, Before We Go, and Gulp.

Toronto Fringe’s New Young Reviewers 2024 | Round Two

The second round of reviews from the Toronto Fringe's New Young Reviewers program is here!

By Toronto Fringe New Young Reviewers Program
the last timbit iPhoto caption: Photo by Dahlia Katz.

REVIEW: The Last Timbit is a surprisingly charming commercial gem

The Last Timbit, a show of snow and sweets, had a limited run at the Elgin Theatre in June and is getting a streaming release on Crave on August 12. I, for one, am more than curious to see how a wider audience will react.

By Andrea Perez
company of fools iPhoto caption: Photo by JVL Photography.

REVIEW: An unabashedly feminist Macbeth hits all the right notes in Ottawa

Kate Smith's pointed interpretation of the classic tragedy is a definite highlight and forecasts riveting things sure to be in store for Fools’ future programming.

By Eve Beauchamp
A collage of photos from the productions reviewed iPhoto caption: Photos courtesy of the productions photographed. From L-R, top to bottom: The Apartment, MONKS, the bluffs, Colonial Circus, Rat Academy, Remembrance, Koli Kari, Escape From Toronto, and Sheila The Musical.

Toronto Fringe’s New Young Reviewers 2024 | Round One

The first round of reviews from the Toronto Fringe's New Young Reviewers program is here!

By Toronto Fringe New Young Reviewers Program
mary's wedding iPhoto caption: Photo courtesy of Lighthouse Festival Theatre.

REVIEW: Lighthouse Theatre brings haunting edge to Mary’s Wedding

If you, like me, enjoy touching tales of love and loss, then you’ll be happy you saw Mary’s Wedding, even if you leave in tears.

By Mae Smith
Poster for the 2024 Toronto Fringe Festival. iPhoto caption: Poster courtesy of Toronto Fringe.

REVIEWS: Toronto Fringe 2024

This collection of Toronto Fringe Festival capsule reviews will be updated throughout the festival with writing from eight different critics.

By Alethea Bakogeorge, , Ryan Borochovitz

Spotlight

iPhoto caption: Philip Akin at home. Photo by Dahlia Katz.

Spotlight: Philip Akin

“I don't know why it is being placed on Black people to change minds,” says Akin. “I ain't here to pick your intellectual cotton.”

Written by Fiona Raye Clarke, Photography by Dahlia Katz
iPhoto caption: "There are some actors for whom the delight of being funny just fills up every part of what they do, and Maev Beaty is one of those actors," says director Chris Abraham. Photo by Dahlia Katz.

Spotlight: Maev Beaty

“I’ve really realized that those minutes that I spend on stage are minutes of my life,” says Beaty. “We're not up there to present good, clean work — we’re up there to try and catch some truth for the listener that is shared in real time. You can't do that if you're just presenting your good homework; you have to live.”

Written by Mira Miller, Photography by Dahlia Katz

Spotlight: Yvette Nolan

“I don’t believe in this world. I don’t see how we can pull ourselves back from the brink. Human beings are greedy, and not mindful, and the only way I can think about making the world better is by getting rid of a lot of it.”

Written by Aisling Murphy, Photography by Dahlia Katz
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Artist Perspectives

The spectacle of suffering: Toronto theatre’s addiction to trauma porn

Trauma is everywhere in Toronto — on the streets, subway, and stage — and maybe that’s why I’m so bored by it.

By Stephanie Fung
iPhoto caption: Rose Napoli appears as Margaret in her play Mad Madge. Photo by Dahlia Katz.

What is a feminist rom-com?

Rose Napoli reflects on Mad Madge, rom-coms, and the undeniable power of Patrick Swayze.

By Rose Napoli
iPhoto caption: Image by Haley Sarfeld.

Every play is fantastic: A small-city theatre critic’s manifesto

My top priority as a critic will be to furnish every marketing team with as many easily quotable compliments as possible. I'll do this dutifully and without ambivalence.

By Haley Sarfeld

Invisibility cloaks, cardboard rockets, and flying orbs of light: Here’s how Canadian theatre uses the art of magic

In many ways, theatre artists and magicians have the same job. We push the bounds of a live experience to startle audiences into confronting their realities. We aim to tell stories that linger. For a magician, there’s no such thing as “it can’t be done.” It can always be done, one way or another.

By Michael Kras
iPhoto caption: Urjo Kareda was an Estonian-born Canadian theatre and music critic, dramaturg, and stage director. He died in 2001.

Urjo Kareda was metal as hell 

A sign outside Urjo Kareda's office read, "no whining." A framed letter inside said "Fuck you, Mr. Kareda."

By Ivana Shein

The good and the bad (and everything in between)

If we’re not building a theatre that can hold the contradictions of our time, let alone the contradictions that make humans human, we probably shouldn’t be making theatre.

By Cole Lewis, , Patrick Blenkarn