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/By / Mar 26, 2024
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Brock Poirier
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Brock Poirier

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iPhoto caption: Photo courtesy of Lighthouse Theatre Festival.

REVIEW: Doris and Ivy in the Home explores aging with heart and humour 

Norm Foster’s Doris and Ivy in the Home, directed by Jane Spence, is an exploration of friendship, love, and intimacy amidst the inevitable process of aging.

By Janine Marley
iPhoto caption: Weyni Mengesha, artistic director of Soulpepper Theatre

Soulpepper’s 2024-25 season pairs Canadian classics with thrilling premieres and gorgeous music

“The stories that we’re putting on stage are to [allow] people to feel reflected in their city, and to make them feel like they have agency,” says artistic director Weyni Mengesha. “These are all just steps to continue to empower folks, and make them feel like there are places they can go to enrich their life in so many ways.”

By Nathaniel Hanula-James
iPhoto caption: Poster courtesy of Ottawa Fringe

Ottawa Fringe unveils eclectic 2024 lineup

Selected by lottery and made up of 50 productions playing a total of more than 300 performances, the offerings include drama, comedy, musical theatre, improv, and more.

By Liam Donovan
iPhoto caption: Jessica Vosk and Kelli Barrett in Beaches the Musical. Photo by Trudie Lee.

‘Their most important love is for each other’: Inside the lifelong female friendships of Beaches the Musical

“Usually, when we put women on the stage, we either pit them against each other for the affections of a man,” says actor Kelli Barrett, who stars opposite Jessica Vosk in Beaches the Musical. “A platonic female friendship that is still a love story is very rare — not since Wicked, and even then, Glinda and Elphaba are mortal enemies for a long time.”

By Aisling Murphy
iPhoto caption: Photo by Michael Cooper

REVIEW: Chiara Isotton burns like a supernova in COC’s Medea

Isotton is riveting, offering a masterful vocal and physical performance that swings wildly from one emotional episode to the next.

By Stephen Low
iPhoto caption: Photo by Dahlia Katz.

The Wrong Bashir is a celebration of family both on and off the stage

“What's great about this play,” says actor Sugith Varughese, “is that it respects and honours the culture and traditions of [the Ismaili] community, but also it takes them for granted. Non-Ismaili audiences are going to be dropped into the world of this family, this community. It’s a bit ‘inside baseball’ to start, but you’ll figure it out. It’s like a medical show where you just get caught up in the jargon. What Zahida is doing… represents a maturity of cultural expression, which is why I wanted to do the play.”

By Nathaniel Hanula-James